AEGENA’S LIVADI _ LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS

A project on the comprehension and reinstatement of a woundedlandscape and a forsaken ancient topos (necropolis),on the Livadi settlement, at the island of Aegina.

  • Year: 2014
  • Function: Landscape, culture
  • Site Location: Aegena, Greece
  • Nationality: Greece
  • City and date of birth: Athens 24 – 02 – 1984
  • Institution: University of Patras – School of Architecture
  • Tutor: Mr. Athanasios Spanomarides Counselor: Mrs. Stella Pantelia
  • Contact: kwk1138@gmail.comcargocollective.com/kwn-1138

 

The north coastline of the island of Aegena (Livadi area) is consisted from jagged rocky formations, small coves and beaches, bush like vegetation and ancient greek burial sites.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

The project focuses on two rocky peninsulas which are connected by a narrow strip of sandy beach. On both peninsulas the ancient remnants of stone carved tombs and other ceremonial constructions, are not distinguishable from the rest of the landscape. The current project aims to restore the altered topography and to associate it with the forgotten memories and legends.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

 

Conclusions of the site’s data analysis observed from a sonic point of view revealed hidden geometrical structures, relations and feelings. These invisible concepts return to the landscape as actual matter in order to create a new topos (place) which refers to the unification of the fragmented landscape in order to activate the forsaken place’s memories.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Byl-ryVuP7Y

The landscape elements as sound frequencies

 

A pathway becomes the medium in order to perceive, to reveal and to understand the landscape’s hidden qualities. Monolithic constructions that emerge from the landscape are acting as boundaries or landmarks highlighting the area. Past is revealed to present as a natural continuity.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

At the northernmost point of the west peninsula, a pillar of light signals the existence of the first necropolis that at nightfall it illuminates the borders of coastline, indicating its former borders.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

On the easternmost part, a long wall is retaining the steep and flimsy ground from further rockslides. Land and sea are connected smoothly through a series of protected public spaces – lookout points.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

The beach becomes wider and the small gulf’s seabed is being illuminated at night, revealing the sunken fragments of the necropolis, reuniting them.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

A long wall at the east peninsula, acts both as an entrance to the archaeological site and also as an observatory for the surrounding area, highlighting the boundary of the necropolis.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

The burial site of the Aegenean warriors* who died heroically at the naval battle of Salamis (480 B.C.) is indicated by grouping the lined-up tombs with a perforated concrete plinth.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

Last but not least, at the easternmost part of the site, lies a ‘‘hidden port’’, a place where the Aegenean warships could stay hidden from enemy spies. A half submerged construction, a tomb for the sailors ship, a carved trireme, is placed there as a reference to the Aegenean’s decisive role at the battle of Salamis and to their great naval tradition.

AEGENA’S LIVADI LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS Konstantinos Kosmas

AEGENA’S LIVADI
LANDSCAPE + MEMORY FRAGMENTS
Konstantinos Kosmas

 

* Ancient Aegeneans, were mainly traders and shipbuilders. Their huge fleet helped them control all sea routes of the Eastern Mediterranean sea.

Opposing city-states had a poor reputation about them because they were considered greedy. Their alliance with the Persian Empire at the first campaign against the Greeks worsened the relationships with their fellow countrymen. The only thing they could do to redeem themselves from the accusation of treason, was to join the fight against the intimidating Persian fleet at the naval battle of Salamis (480 BC). The 30 warships of the Aegenean fleet led the vanguard, fought bravely and were honored by the Delphic Oracle.

Through local traditions it is said that the dead warriors were buried as heroes at the current necropolis.

 

Author: Konstantinos Kosmas