THE MUSIC OF TOMORROW

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Hi There!

This week it’s time to focus on dancing in the future!
Dance parties have become increasingly more glossy with weekend festivals and package trips to Ibiza, clubs becoming more commercial, weekend extravaganzas and the big name DJs.
But what’s coming next?
We give you some clues organized in four themes.

NEW PLACES TO DANCE
1 – Life After Sundown: Disco Architecture in the Global City
What might disco have to do with the development and rhythm of the global city? Even better, what is the value of considering these types of spaces against our current political moment? Alan Ruiz develops a series of studies on the architecture of a disco.

2 – Rave Is Not A Crime: London’s Free Party Scene Is Booming
From Clash, an inside view of these “clandestine” events that are spreading along the British countryside.

3 – Populous to design spherical music venues in Las Vegas and London
Dezeen shares a new proposal from Populus for a music arena, that “will be equipped with game-changing technologies that push the limits of connectivity, acoustics, video, and content distribution”.

THE FUTURE OF DANCING MUSIC
4 – 5 WAYS DANCE-MUSIC CULTURE IS CHANGING AND EVOLVING
We are currently in the middle of a critical time for dance music and here’s what Magnetic Magazine expects to happen in the future.

5 – Run the code: is algorave the future of dance music?
From The Guardian, a short movie directed by Noah Payne-Frank showing us how algorave is combining music with coding, by building up tracks through the manipulation of programming code.

NEW WAYS TO MAKE MUSIC
6 – Doing it for themselves: the practices of amateur musicians and DIY music networks in a digital age
An article by Alan Chamberlain that reflects on the network of DIY music communities in the UK that see digital technologies transforming ways in which part-time amateur musicians are able to collaborate creatively and form alliances.

7 – Wild Sound by Glenn Kotche
The composer Glenn Kotche shows his project called Wild Sound that challenges the distinctions that exist between music and noise, instrument and everyday object, performance and daily life.

TECHNOLOGICAL ENHANCEMENTS
8 – Wearable pods let musicians compose and perform tracks as vibrations on your skin
Marie Tricaud has designed a set of wearable modules that let live music be performed as “vibration loops and temperature melodies” on your skin.

9 – Liron Gino designs Vibeat devices for deaf people to experience music
Liron Gino has designed a set of jewellery-like devices that allow deaf and hard-of-hearing people to experience music through vibration.

See you all soon,
Daniela